Win a free website!

by becoming our 100th customer

We are getting very close to welcoming our 100th local council customer and would like to celebrate by offering a free website to whoever signs up as our 100th member. The site will be designed and set up with all your content, all you will need to pay is ongoing hosting costs.

Get a quote now – the 100th person to sign-up for a website will win it!

Click to get a quote

To be in with a chance of winning, all you need to do is mention the competition when requesting or accepting a quote from us (it doesn’t matter if we sent you a quote before the competition was announced – the winner of the competition will be the 100th council to return the signed contract to us).

The winner will be announced on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Get ready for GDPR

Why You Need to Care About GDPR

Every time you collect an email address, a name, home address or phone number, you are obtaining someone’s personal data. If any of those people are citizens of the European Union, you must adhere to the new rules. But don’t stress! We’ll explain the basics and provide some tips to help you transition.

The GDPR was developed to modernize the current EU data protection laws with a stronger focus on an individual’s rights and privacy. While some of the legislation is stricter and the penalties for non-compliance are tougher, the ultimate goal is to improve trust in the digital ecosystem.

To that end, EU citizens will have several new rights to help them take more control of their own data. Here are the most important user rights that apply to local councils:

  1. Right to be forgotten gives someone the power to ask a company to delete ALL of the data that is associated with that person. If a user makes a request, you must delete all the data stored in your databases and anything else associated with the user.
  2. Right of access allows your parishioners to ask exactly how you are using their data and for what purposes. If a request is made, you’ll need to provide a personal data report at no cost to them.
  3. Breach Notification is mandatory under the GDPR, which means you have 72 hours from becoming aware of the breach to notify parishioners.
  4. Right of portability lets people request their data, which means you would need to download a file of all their data in a ‘commonly used and machine-readable format’.

Now that each individual has the power to request or delete their data, you need to think about what data you really need and what data you can live without. The more data you collect, the more documentation and management is required to quickly address a data request.

 

What is a responsive website and why does it matter?

A responsive website is one that adjusts to different screen sizes, whether someone is viewing it on a phone, tablet or desktop pc.

How can you tell if your site is responsive?

Simple, either view it on a mobile phone or if you are looking at it on your computer, just drag the edge of the browser to make it narrower and watch how the site responds. If you find that the site stays the same but just get smaller you are not offering your users a good browsing experience as it is difficult to read the text. A good design will re-flow – the different elements will rearrange themselves so that the content is easy to read at different screen sizes.

Alternatively, visit Google and enter the URL (web address) of your site: https://search.google.com/test/mobile-friendly

This is important for a number of reasons:

  • Nowadays, more people browse the web using their phone than using a traditional pc.
  • Sites that are not responsive can be hard to read on smaller screens or can result in the user having to scroll sideways to view the full page content.
  • Google prioritises sites that offer a good mobile experience – this means you site will rank higher in search results.

How can we help?

All our sites are designed to be fully responsive as standard. Let us set you up a new modern website.

Request a Quote Now!

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When must the annual parish meeting be held

The annual parish meeting is not a parish council meeting. The months when the meeting must be held and the starting time of the meeting are defined by law.

The annual parish meeting must be held between 1st March and 1st June (inclusive). The date must be decided by the parish council – not by the chairman or clerk.

The annual parish meeting may not start before 6pm (LG 1972 s 14 (4)).